Volume 877, Issue 1 p. 309-338

Cortical Afferents to the Extended Amygdala

ALEXANDER J. McDONALD

Corresponding Author

ALEXANDER J. McDONALD

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA

Voice: 803-733-3378; fax: 803-733-3212; [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
SARA J. SHAMMAH-LAGNADO

SARA J. SHAMMAH-LAGNADO

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of São Paulo, Institute of Biomedical Science, São Paulo, SP 05508, Brazil

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CHANGJUN SHI

CHANGJUN SHI

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA

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MICHAEL DAVIS

MICHAEL DAVIS

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA

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First published: 06 February 2006
Citations: 225

Abstract

ABSTRACT: The projections of the cerebral cortex to the extended amygdala were studied in the rat using anterograde and retrograde tract-tracing techniques. Most cortical areas with strong projections to the extended amygdala preferentially targeted either the medial extended amygdala (including the medial amygdalar nucleus, ventromedial substantia innominata, and the medial part of the bed nucleus the stria terminalis) or the central extended amygdala (including the central amygdalar nucleus, dorsolateral substantia innominata, and the lateral part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis). Some cortical areas, however, had equal projections to both medial and central portions. The main areas projecting preferentially to the medial extended amygdala were the ventral subiculum, infralimbic cortex, ventral agranular insular area, and the rostral part of the ventrolateral entorhinal area. The main areas projecting preferentially to the central extended amygdala were the prefrontal cortex, viscerosensory and somatosensory portions of the insular cortex, and the amygdalopiriform transitional area. It is suggested that these cortical inputs may be important for cognitive, mnemonic, and affective aspects of emotional and motivated behavior.