Volume 1169, Issue 1 p. 89-92

Beta and Gamma Rhythms in Human Auditory Cortex during Musical Beat Processing

Takako Fujioka

Takako Fujioka

Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Laurel J. Trainor

Laurel J. Trainor

Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Edward W. Large

Edward W. Large

Center for Complex System and Brain Sciences, Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA

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Bernhard Ross

Bernhard Ross

Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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First published: 24 July 2009
Citations: 160
Address for correspondence: Takako Fujioka, Ph.D., 3560 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, M6A 2E1, Canada. Voice: +1-416-785-2500x3413; fax: +1-416-785-2862. [email protected]

Abstract

We examined β- (∼20 Hz) and γ- (∼40 Hz) band activity in auditory cortices by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG) during passive listening to a regular musical beat with occasional omission of single tones. The β activity decreased after each tone, followed by an increase, thus forming a periodic modulation synchronized with the stimulus. The β decrease was absent after omissions. In contrast, γ-band activity showed a peak after tone and omission, suggesting underlying endogenous anticipatory processes. We propose that auditory β and γ oscillations have different roles in musical beat encoding and auditory–motor interaction.