Volume 1036, Issue 1 p. 382-392

Serotonin and Aggression

BEREND OLIVIER

Corresponding Author

BEREND OLIVIER

Department of Psychopharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neuroscience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands, Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Address for corrrespondence: Department of Psychopharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neuroscience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 36, 3584CA Utrecht, the Netherlands. Voice: 31 30 2533529; fax: 31 30 253 7900. [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
First published: 23 July 2010
Citations: 101
Address for corrrespondence: Department of Psychopharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neuroscience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 36, 3584CA Utrecht, the Netherlands. Voice: 31 30 2533529; fax: 31 30 253 7900. [email protected]

Abstract

Abstract: The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in the modulation of aggression in animals and humans. A longstanding dogma that aggression and serotonergic activity are inversely related has to be abandoned in light of many new findings. Trait and state aggression are differentially regulated by the 5-HT system and different 5-HT receptors seem to be involved. Of the 14 different 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT1B receptor, particularly the postsynaptically located 5-HT1B heteroreceptor, plays a highly selective role in the modulation of offensive aggression. We are still far from understanding the complex role played by the serotonergic system in the modulation of a complex set of behaviors like aggression.